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 Listed are common species of pheasants kept in private and public aviaries. Browse down to view pictures and descriptions

See -AMERICAN PHEASANT AND WATERFOWL SOCIETY - LIST 35 species of pheasant in taxonomic order Here

PHEASANTS

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pheasants are a group of large birds in the order Galliformes.

 

Pheasant are characterised by strong sexual dimorphism, with males being highly ornate with bright colours and adornments such as wattles and long tails.

 

Males are usually larger than the females, and have longer tails. Males play no part in rearing the young.

 

Pheasants typically eat seeds and some insects. While on the ground, a group of pheasants is called a nye.

 

There are 35 species of pheasant in 11 different genera.

 

The best-known is the Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) which is widespread throughout the world in introduced feral populations and in farm operations.

 

PHEASANTS

This image was first published in 1st or 2nd edition of Nordisk familjebok (1904 -1926). The copyrights for that book have expired and this image is in the public domain.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Fasansläktet%2C_Nordisk_familjebok.jpg

Common Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Common Pheasant

The Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), is a bird in the pheasant family (Phasianidae).

It is native to Asia but has been widely introduced elsewhere as a game bird. In parts of its range, namely in places where none of its relatives occur such as in Europe (where it is naturalized), it is simply known as "the pheasant".

It is a well-known gamebird, among those of more than regional importance perhaps the most widespread and ancient one in the whole world.

The Common Pheasant is one of the world's most hunted birds, has it has been introduced for that purpose to many regions, and is also common on game farms where it is commercially farmed for this purpose.

"Ring-necked Pheasant" is a collective name for a number of subspecies and their crossbreeds.

These were commonly used for introduction purposes, and today the Ring-necked Pheasant is the state bird of South Dakota, one of only three US state birds that is not a species native to the United States.

The Green Pheasant (P. versicolor) of Japan is sometimes placed as subspecies within the Common Pheasant.

Though the species produce fertile hybrids wherever they coexist, this is simply a typical feature among Galloanseres, in which postzygotic isolating mechanisms are slight compared to most other birds.

The species apparently have somewhat different ecological requirements and at least in its typical habitat the Green outcompetes the Common Pheasant; introduction of the present species to Japan has therefore largely failed.

Common Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A male Common Pheasant (Phasianus_colchicus) that had found it's way into my garden on the morning of February 1, 2008

Licensing Matthew Oakley

I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain.

Blood Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Blood Pheasant, Ithaginis cruentus, is the only species in genus Ithaginis of the Pheasant family. It has 15 different subspecies.

This species' name comes from the fact that the males have vivid red coloring on the feathers of the breast, throat and forehead.

Females are more uniformly colored with duller shades of reddish brown.

Both males and females have a distinct ring of bare skin around the eye that is crimson colored, in addition to red feet.

Subspecies are determined by varying amounts of red and black feathers.

The Blood Pheasant lives in the mountains of Nepal, Sikkim, Tibet, northern Burma and the north-west areas of China.

The habitat most preferred by Blood Pheasants is coniferous or mixed forests and scrub areas right at the snowline.

The pheasants move their range depending on the seasons and during the summer are found at higher elevations.

Populations move to lower elevations as the snow increases in the fall and winter.

The Blood Pheasant is the state bird of the Indian state of Sikkim.

Blood Pheasant

Image:BloodPheasantGouldRichter.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Cheer Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Cheer Pheasant, Catreus wallichi also known as Wallich's Pheasant is an endangered species of the pheasant family, Phasianidae. It is the only member in monotypic genus Catreus.

 

The Cheer Pheasant is distributed in the highlands and scrublands of the Himalayas region of India, Nepal and Pakistan. These birds lack the color and brilliance of most pheasants, with buffy gray plumage and long gray crests. Its long tail is gray and brown. The female is slightly smaller in overall size.

 

The scientific name commemorates the Danish botanist Nathaniel Wallich.

Due to ongoing habitat loss, small population size and hunting in some areas, the Cheer Pheasant is evaluated as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix I of CITES. While an endangered species, there are attempts to reintroduce captive bred Cheer Pheasant in Pakistan.

Cheer Pheasant

Image:Catreus wallichi.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Elliot's Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Elliot's Pheasant, Syrmaticus ellioti also known as Bar-backed Pheasant is a large, up to 80cm long, brown and white pheasant with a black throat, chestnut brown upperparts plumage, white belly, nape and wingbars, red bare facial skin and long rusty-barred whitish tail.

The female is a rufous brown bird with blackish throat, whitish belly and white-tipped tail.

The Elliot's Pheasant is endemic to China, where it lives in evergreen and mountain forests of southeastern China, at altitudes up to 6,200 feet.

The diet consists mainly of seeds, leaves and berries.

The name commemorates the American ornithologist Daniel Giraud Elliot.

Due to ongoing habitat lost, limited range and being hunted for food, the Elliot's Pheasant is evaluated as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix I of CITES.

Elliot's Pheasant

Image:ElliotPheasant.jpg

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Golden Pheasant

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Golden Pheasant or "Chinese Pheasant", (Chrysolophus pictus) is a gamebird of the order Galliformes (gallinaceous birds) and the family Phasianidae.

It is native to forests in mountainous areas of western China but feral populations have been established in the United Kingdom and elsewhere.

The adult male is 90-105 cm in length, its tail accounting for two-thirds of the total length.

It is unmistakable with its golden crest and rump and bright red body.

The deep orange "cape" can be spread in display, appearing as an alternating black and orange fan that covers all of the face except its bright yellow eye, with a pinpoint black pupil.

Males have a golden-yellow crest with a hint of red at the tip.

The face, throat, chin, and the sides of neck are rusty tan. The wattles and orbital skin are both yellow in colour, and the ruff or cape is light orange.

The upper back is green and the rest of the back and rump are golden-yellow in colour.

The tertiaries are blue whereas the scapulars are dark red.

Another characteristic of the male plumage is the central tail feathers which are black spotted with cinnamon as well as the tip of the tail being a cinnamon buff.

The upper tail coverts are the same colour as the central tail feathers. Males also have a scarlet breast, and scarlet and light chestnut flanks and underparts. Lower legs and feet are a dull yellow.

The female (hen) is much less showy, with a duller mottled brown plumage similar to that of the female Common Pheasant.

She is darker and more slender than the hen of that species, with a proportionately longer tail (half her 60-80 cm length).

The female's breast and sides are barred buff and blackish brown, and the abdomen is plain buff.

She has a buff face and throat. Some abnormal females may later in their lifetime get some male plumage. Lower legs and feet are a dull yellow.

Both males and females have yellow legs and yellow bills.

Despite the male's showy appearance, these hardy birds are very difficult to see in their natural habitat, which is dense, dark young conifer forests with sparse undergrowth.

Consequently, little is known of their behaviour in the wild.

They feed on the ground on grain, leaves and invertebrates, but roost in trees at night. Whilst they can fly, they prefer to run: but if startled they can suddenly burst upwards at great speed, with a distinctive wing sound.

Although they can fly in short bursts they are quite clumsy in flight and spend most of their time on the ground.

Golden Pheasants lay 8-12 eggs at a time and will then incubate these for around 22-23 days.

They tend to eat berries, grubs, seeds and other types of vegetation.

The male has a metallic call in the breeding season.

Golden Pheasant

Image:Golden Pheasant 3638.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chrysolophus pictus (en: Golden Pheasant, de: Goldfasan)

Date 2005-08-15 Author Dirk Beyer Permission GFDL and cc-by-sa-2.5

This is a cropped version of the original (first) version.

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation license, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Golden_Pheasant_3638.jpg

Green Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Green Pheasant, Phasianus versicolor also known as Japanese Pheasant is a bird of the lowlands.

Closely related to the Common Pheasant, the cock is distinguished by dark green plumage on breast and mantle.

The male has an iridescent violet neck, red bare facial skin and purplish green tail.

The female is smaller than male, and has a dull brown plumage with dark spots.

Native and endemic to the Japanese Archipelago, the Green Pheasant is the national bird of Japan.

This species is common and widespread throughout its native range.

It frequents farmlands and is often seen close to human settlements; it also has been introduced in Hawaii and the United States as a gamebird.

Some authorities consider the Green Pheasant a subspecies of the Common Pheasant.

Green Pheasant

 

Male (left) and female.

Uniform color of male (with no white on neck) and spotted underside of female are characteristic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Phasianus_versicolor%28Male_female%29.jpg

Grey Peacock-pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Grey Peacock-pheasant, Polyplectron bicalcaratum also known as Burmese Peacock or Chinquis Peacock-pheasant is a large, up to 76cm long, greyish brown pheasant with finely spotted green ocelli, elongated bushy crest, bare pink or yellow facial skin, white throat, and grey iris, bill and legs.

Both sexes are similar. The female is smaller and darker than male. The young resembles the female.

The Grey Peacock-pheasant is distributed to lowland and hill forests of mainland southeast Asia, but excluding most of Indochina.

The female usually lays two eggs. The diet consists mainly of seeds, termites, fruits and invertebrates.

The phylogeny of this species is fairly enigmatic

. mtDNA cytochrome b and D-loop as well as the nuclear ovomucoid intron G data confirms that it belongs to a clade together with Germain's Peacock-pheasant, but also the "brown" southernly species Bronze-tailed Peacock-pheasant and Mountain Peacock-pheasant (Kimball et al. 2001).

The molecular data suggests that its closest relative - though not with high confidence - is the Bronze-tailed Peacock-pheasant.

This is unlikely to be strictly correct for two reasons. First, biogeography is equivocal towards the timing of divergence of the "brown" species, tentatively suggesting the Mountain Peacock-pheasant may be a more recent divergence from mainland stock.

Second, the molecular data itself is spurious in this species, the most morphologically diverse and widespread Polyplectron:

There is no data on the origin and number of specimens, but it is fairly likely that only a single bird, possibly of captive origin and undeterminable subspecific allocation, was sampled.

All that can be reasonably assumed is that the Grey Peacock-pheasant evolved on mainland Southeast Asia, probably during the Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene (3.6-1 mya[1]).

Lowe's Grey Peacock-pheasant, P. b. bailyi, was described from a captive bird of unknown provenance (Lowe 1924).

Similar examples have turned up on occasion, but the validity and - if distinct - home range of this taxon remains unknown.

It was theorized to inhabit western Assam or the eastern Himalayas, but this is based on conjecture.

The Grey Peacock-pheasant is the national bird of Burma.

Widespread throughout its large range, the Grey Peacock-pheasant is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix II of CITES

Grey Peacock-pheasant

 

Image:PeacockPheasantGould.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

A Century of Birds from the Himalayas (1830-32)

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This applies to the United States, Canada, the European Union and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:PeacockPheasantGould.jpg

Kalij Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Kalij Pheasant, Lophura leucomelanos is a pheasant found all along the foothills of the Himalaya in a number of local populations with variations. They are also found (though somewhat rare) in the Islands of Hawaii.

 

References

BirdLife International (2004). Lophura leucomelanos. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 9 May 2006. Database entry includes justification for why this species is of least concern

 

External links

BirdLife Species Factsheet

gbwf.org - Kalij Pheasant

Kalij Pheasant

 

Image:Kalij-pheasant Hawaii.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

English: Kalij pheasant photographed in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, USA 12-16-2006.(taken by myself: Jeff Gladden)

Source

Originally from en.wikipedia; description page is/was here.

Date

2006-12-22 (original upload date)

Author

Original uploader was Jsgladden at en.wikipedia

Permission

PD-AUTHOR; Released into the public domain (by the author).

 

2006-12-22 19:46 Jsgladden 855?500?8 (123211 bytes) Kalij pheasant photographed in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, USA 12-16-2006(taken by myself: Jeff Gladden){{No rights reserved}}

 

In case this is not legally possible:. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Kalij-pheasant_Hawaii.jpg

Koklass Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Koklass Pucrasia macrolopha is a species of the Pheasant family, Phasianidae, and is the only species in the genus Pucrasia.

Koklass (Pucrasia macrolopha) is a monotypic species of genus Pucrasia with nine subspecies recognised so far. These are:

1 Indian koklass (P. m. macrolopha),

2 Western koklass (P. m. castanea),

3 Kashmir koklass (P. m. biddulphi),

4 Nepal koklass (P. m. nipalensis),

5 Meyer's koklass (P. m. meyeri),

6 Orange-collared koklass (P. m. rufficollis),

7 Yellow-necked koklass (P. m. xanthospila),

8 Joret's koklass (P. m. jorentiana) and

9 Darwin's koklass (P. m. darwini).

 

This entry deals with the subspecies P. m. biddulphi, which ranges from Kashmir east to Kullu in India.

 

With exception of the subspecies nipalensis, castanea and macrolopha, which are endemic to the southern side of northwest and western Himalaya, other five are confined to China and Mongolia.

 

The Koklass is a medium sized elusive bird confined to high altitude forests from Afghanistan to central Nepal, and in northeastern Tibet to northern and eastern China.

 

Upper parts of male Koklass are covered with silver-grey plumage streaked velvety-black down the centre of each feather, and it has the unique feature of a black head, chestnut breast and prominent white patches on the sides of neck.

 

The females differ from males in above characters and instead their upper parts are covered with pale brown plumage.

 

Both sexes, however, have distinct elongated tails tipped with pale feathers.

 

The males are known to weigh about 1135 - 1415g and the females, about 1025 -1135g, with the body length varying from 58 - 64cm and 18 - 22cm respectively. Immature and juveniles resemble adult females in plumage pattern.

 

Like the Western Tragopan, it does not extend its range above the tree line.

 

One of the less colourful pheasants, the Koklass exhibits moderate sexual dimorphism.

 

Though they skulk under bushes, which makes direct sighting difficult, they give loud chorus/predawn calls during the breeding season and during autumn, revealing their presence.

 

They remain in pairs or small family groups throughout the year.

 

They nest on the ground and spend the nights roosting on trees, or under rock overhangs.

Image:Pucrasia macrolopha hm.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pucrasia macrolopha Painting from Hume and Marshall, 1880, Gamebirds of India, Burmah, Ceylon.

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This applies to the United States, Canada, the European Union and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years.

Lady Amherst's Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Lady Amherst's Pheasant, Chrysolophus amherstiae is a gamebird of the order Galliformes and the family Phasianidae.

These are native to south western China and Myanmar, but have been introduced elsewhere, and have established a self-supporting, but now declining, feral population in England the stronghold of which is now in Bedfordshire.

The adult male is 100-120 cm in length, its tail accounting for 80 cm of the total length. It is unmistakable with its black and silver head, long grey tail and rump, and red, blue, white and yellow body plumage. The "cape" can be raised in display.

This species is closely related to the Golden Pheasant and the introduced populations in England will interbreed.

The female is much less showy, with a duller mottled brown plumage all over, similar to that of the female Common Pheasant but with finer barring.

She is very like the female Golden Pheasant, but has a darker head and cleaner underparts than the hen of that species.

Despite the male's showy appearance, these birds are very difficult to see in their natural habitat, which is dense, dark forests with thick undergrowth. Consequently, little is known of their behaviour in the wild.

They feed on the ground on grain, leaves and invertebrates, but roost in trees at night.

Whilst they can fly, they prefer to run, but if startled they can suddenly burst upwards at great speed, with a distinctive wing sound.

The male has a gruff call in the breeding season.

The name commemorates Sarah Countess Amherst, wife of William Pitt Amherst, Governor General of Bengal, who was responsible for sending the first specimen of the bird to London in 1828.

 Widespread throughout its large range, the Lady Amherst's Pheasant is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Lady Amherst's Pheasant

  Lady Amherst Pheasant Cock

Lady Amherst Cock

Lady Amherst Pheasant 

Lady Amherst Pheasant Cock and Hen 

Photos by: Bill Morrison, Pheasants In Paradise

Author Heinz Albers, www.heinzalbers.orgr of this work, hereby publish it under the following licenses:

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation license, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Diamantfasan.jpg

Malayan Peacock-pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Malayan Peacock-pheasant, Polyplectron malacense also known as Crested Peacock-pheasant or Malaysian Peacock-pheasant is a medium-sized, up to 53cm long, spotted black, brownish pheasant with an elongated dark blue green crest, bare red facial skin, bluish-white iris and green ocelli on upperbody plumage and its tail of twenty two feathers.

The female is smaller and duller than male.

A shy and elusive bird, the Malayan Peacock-pheasant is distributed and endemic to lowland forests of Malay Peninsula.

At one time, this species was widespread in Malaysia, Thailand and also reported from Myanmar, Singapore and Sumatra.

It is now disappeared from most of its former range. The remaining population confined to central Malaysia.

Together with the even more elusive Bornean Peacock-pheasant , its sister species, and the more distantly related Palawan Peacock-pheasant it represents a basal group in its genus; their radiation probably took place during the Pliocene (Kimball et al. 2001).

Due to ongoing habitat loss, small population size and limited range, the Malayan Peacock-pheasant is evaluated as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix II of CITES.

 

Malayan Peacock-pheasant

 

Image:BxZ Polyplectron malacense 00.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Description: Malayan Peacock Pheasant - Source: own work - Location: Bronx Zoo, New York - Author: self, User:Stavenn

I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby publish it under the following licenses:

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation license, Version 1.2

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:BxZ_Polyplectron_malacense_00.jpg

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Mountain Peacock-pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Mountain Peacock-pheasant, Polyplectron inopinatum also known as Rothschild's Peacock-pheasant or Mirror Pheasant is a medium-sized, up to 65cm long, blackish brown pheasant with small ocelli and long graduated tail feathers.

Both sexes are similar. The male has metallic blue ocelli on upperparts, green ocelli on tail of twenty feathers and two spurs on legs.

Female has black ocelli on upperparts, unspurred legs and tail of eighteen feathers. The female is smaller and duller than male.

A shy and elusive bird, the Mountain Peacock-pheasant is distributed and endemic to mountain forests of central Malay Peninsula.

The diet consists mainly of berries, beetles and ants.

mtDNA cytochrome b and D-loop as well as the nuclear ovomucoid intron G data confirms that this species belongs to a clade together with the Bronze-tailed Peacock-pheasant, but also the mainland species Germain's Peacock-pheasant and Grey Peacock-pheasant (Kimball et al. 2001).

The molecular data suggests - though not with high confidence - that this species diverged from mainland stock earlier than the Bronze-tailed Peacock-pheasant. This is quite spurious, since its biogeography and derived plumage, and the fact that it is a peninsular mountain endemic indicate it is derived from a fairly small founder population; this would confound molecular analyses. What seems clear is that the present species evolved from mainland Southeast Asian stock, probably during the Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene (3.6-1 mya[1]). The unique pattern of wings and tail thus is, contrary to long-held opinion, an autapomorphy, and the southern species of this clade - formerly separated in the genus Chalcurus - are probably not each other's closest relatives.

Due to ongoing habitat loss, small population size and limited range, the Mountain Peacock-pheasant is evaluated as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix III of CITES in Malaysia.

Mountain Peacock-pheasant

 

Image:BxZ Polyplectron inopinatum 00b.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

02:38, 10 September 2006 Stavenn

(taken at Bronx Zoo, New York)

I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:BxZ_Polyplectron_inopinatum_00b.jpg

Palawan Peacock-pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Palawan Peacock-pheasant, Polyplectron napoleonis also known as Napoleon Peacock-pheasant is a medium-sized, up to 50cm long, bird in the family Phasianidae.

It was long known as Polyplectron emphanum (Dickinson 2001).

The male is the handsomest and most peacock-like member of genus Polyplectron.

It has an erectile crest, white stripe over eye, and highly iridescence metallic green and black plumage.

The tail feathers are decorated with large blue-green ocelli, which may be spread fan-like in courtship display.

The female is smaller than male. It has a dark brown plumage with short crest, and whitish on throat, cheeks and eyebrow.

A Philippines endemic, the Palawan Peacock-pheasant is distributed to humid forests of Palawan Island in the southern part of Philippines archipelago.

The female usually lays up to two eggs.

The Palawan Peacock-pheasant with its unique male plumage and distant range represents a basal (Early? Pliocene, c.5-4 mya[2]) offshoot of the genus Polyplectron (Kimball et al. 2001).

Due to ongoing habitat loss, small population size, limited range and hunting and capture for trade, the Palawan Peacock-pheasant is classified as Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix I of CITES.

Palawan Peacock-pheasant

 

Image:Palawan Peacock Pheasant - male.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

male Palawan Peacock Pheasant (Polyplectron napoleonis) at the Bronx Zoo.

August 24, 2006 User:Dante Alighieri

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation license, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; If you want to use this file commercially, you have to do this under the terms of the GFDL.

Otherwise, you are free to choose between the GFDL and CC-BY-NC-SA-2.0.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Palawan_Peacock_Pheasant_-_male.jpg

 

Image:Palawan peacock.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

male Palawan peacock-pheasant

 

December 11, 2007 Llimchiu I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby publish it under the following licenses: This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license versions 3.0, 2.5, 2.0, and 1.0. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Palawan_peacock.jpg

Reeves's Pheasant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Reeves's Pheasant, Syrmaticus reevesii is a large (up to 210cm long) pheasant with in the genus Syrmaticus. It is endemic to China.

The name commemorates the British naturalist John Reeves, who first introduced live specimens to Europe in 1831.

The male is a brightly plumaged bird with a scaled golden white and red body plumage, grey legs, brown iris and red skin around eye. The head is white with a black narrow band across its eyes. The male has an extremely long silvery white tail barred with chestnut brown.

This spectacular pheasant is mentioned in the Guinness World Records 2008 for having the longest natural tail feather of any bird species; a record formerly held by the Crested Argus Pheasant. It can measure up to 2.4 metres or 8 feet long.

The female is a brown bird with blackish crown, buff face and grey brown barred tail feathers. The hen Reeves's Pheasant is the same size as a male Common Pheasant.

There are no known subspecies but there is some variation in plumage.

The Reeves's Pheasant is endemic to evergreen forests of central and eastern China. Where introduced they also inhabit farmland close to woodlands.

They have been introduced for sport and ornamental purposes to Hawaii, USA, Czech Republic, France and the UK. In the latter three countries they have built up small breeding populations, and are still released on a small scale for shooting, often alongside Common Pheasants.

Due to ongoing habitat loss, and overhunting for food and its tail plumes, the Reeves's Pheasant is evaluated as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. There are thought to be only around 2000 birds remaining in the wild.

Reeves's Pheasants are known to be aggressive towards humans, animals and other pheasants.

Reeves's Pheasant male (foreground) with other ornamental pheasants.

They like higher ground and are hardy birds, being able to withstand heat and cold.

Their call note is unlike other gamebirds in that it is a musical warble, more passerine sounding than would be expected. Their diet is vegetable matter as well as seeds and cereals. They are fairly common in aviculture.

A clutch of 7-14 eggs are laid in April or May and incubated for 24-25 days.

Reeves's Pheasant

Image:BxZ Syrmaticus reevesii 00.jpg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Description: Reeves's Pheasant - Source: own work - Location: Bronx Zoo, New York - Author: self, User:Stavenn

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation license, Version 1.2 or any later version

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:BxZ_Syrmaticus_reevesii_00.jpg

Siamese Fireback

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Siamese Fireback, Lophura diardi also known as Diard's Fireback is a medium-sized, approximately 80cm long, pheasant.

The male has a grey plumage with an extensive red facial skin, crimson legs and feet, ornamental black crest feathers, reddish brown iris and long curved blackish tail.

The female is a brown bird with blackish wing and tail feathers.

The Siamese Fireback is distributed to the lowland and evergreen forests of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam in Southeast Asia.

This species is also designated as the national bird of Thailand.

The female usually lays between four to eight rosy eggs.

The scientific name commemorates the French naturalist Pierre-Médard Diard.

Due to ongoing habitat loss and overhunting in some areas, the Siamese Fireback is evaluated as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

 

Siamese Fireback

 

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Description: The Siamese Fireback, Lophura diardi also known as Diard's Fireback Source: own work - Location: Central Park Zoo, New York Author: self, User:Stavenn

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Silver Pheasant

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The Silver Pheasant, Lophura nycthemera is a large, approximately 125cm long, white pheasant with bare red facial skin, red legs and glossy black below.

The male is adorned with white, long, patterned tail and black dropping crest on its crown.

At least two years is needed to attain full male plumage.

The female is an olive brown with black-tipped crest.

The Silver Pheasant inhabits to the mountain forests of mainland Southeast Asia and China.

There are seventeen subspecies of Silver Pheasant, distributed from east Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, China to the island of Hainan and recently seen in Smiths Station, Alabama.

The nominate subspecies Lophura nycthemera nycthemera of southeastern China and northern Vietnam is the largest and whitest race.

The southern subspecies have varying amounts of grey or black markings and shorter tails.

The Silver Pheasant, widespread and a common species in most of its habitat range, is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Silver Pheasant male

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Silver Pheasant, Lophura nycthemera

Picture taken by User:Diomidis Spinellis at the Attica Zoo.

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 Silver Pheasant female

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Swinhoe's Pheasant

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Swinhoe's Pheasant, Lophura swinhoii, is a bird of the pheasant family Phasianidae that is endemic to Taiwan, where it inhabits primary broadleaved forest and mature secondary forest at 200-2,300 m.

There are no known subspecies.

The male is a spectacular bird, with glossy blue-purple chest, belly and rump, brown shoulder, red facial wattles and bright white tail feathers, back of the neck and crest.

The female, as is typical with pheasant species, is a dark brown barred colour.

The bird was named after the British ornithologist Robert Swinhoe, who first described the species in 1862.

Swinhoe's Pheasants mainly eat seeds and fruits, as well as insects and other animal matter.

The female lays 2-6 eggs which are incubated for 25-28 days.

The young can leave the nest from 2-3 days.

Intensive fieldwork in the early 1970s suggested that there might be 5,000-10,000 individuals, although a recent estimate of c.6,500 in Yushan National Park alone indicates that its total population is likely to exceed 10,000 birds.

Its numbers are probably stable where it is protected, but may be declining elsewhere because of a variety of pressures on its habitat.

Swinhoe's Pheasant

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White-eared Pheasant

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The Genus Crosssoptilon comprises four distinct ecological species of "Eared Pheasants", so named because of their prominent ear tufts.

White Eared Pheasants are called Shagga by indigenous Himalayan peoples. Shagga means Snow Fowl. Shagga are very gregarious birds, living in large flocks which forage on alpine meadow close to or above the snowline throughout the year. White Eared pheasants tend to fly a great deal more than their close relatives the brown eared and blue eared pheasants. All three ecological species are obliged to hover or volplane over deep snow. They do this with the aid of their great wide tails. Eared pheasants move across deep snow by whirring their wings and fluttering close to the ground, and supporting their weight on their retrices, leave characteristic if somewhat other worldly appearing tracks. Eared pheasant flight is often described as poor by the hunter collectors of the 18th century who used dogs to beat the birds from the ground for shooting. Eared Pheasants do not waste their energy on flying when quadrupeds take after them because they have adapted many defensive escape behaviors that do not require flight. When one lives with Eared Pheasants in their natural environment or free ranging in snowy environments, one is surprised at their aptitude for sustained flight- movements that only take them a few hundred yards at a time but in the snowy seasons this is significant nonetheless. This ability to cover large areas by flight is reminiscent of Ptarmigans, Sage Grouse and Syrmaticus Pheasants, all of which inhabit snowy regions and are obliged to forage for food by means of sustained flight during winter. Like these species, the White Eared Pheasant lacks a prominent trailing wing notch.

Shagga forage for tubers and roots in alpine meadows often in the company of Yaks or other hoof stock. In winter, White Eared Pheasants subsist on pine needles, juniper berries, wolf berries, and the desiccated seed pods of iris, lily and allium. When hard pressed during the most severe winter storms which may blow for weeks at a time, Eared Pheasants may subsist upon pine pitch, deer, rabbit and yak dung.

While all known forms of White-eared pheasants are very similar in phenotype, there are behavioral and genetic differences which suggest that their is much to learn about their systematics and behavioral ecology.

The Szechuan White-eared Pheasant, Crossoptilon crossoptilon crossoptilon, is a galliform bird native to the Szechuan region of China. It is a subspecies of White-eared Pheasant, Crossoptilon crossoptilon. This form inhabits high altitudes along exposed rockscapes and may descend to old growth forests in winter. It's wings are dark greyish violet.

This bird is predominantly white, including, as its name suggests, white ears, but is not as white in as many places of its body as its close relatives the Tibetan White-eared Pheasant, C. c. drouyni, and the Yunnan White-eared Pheasant, C. c. lichiangnse. It has black tail feathers and wingtips and as well as a patch of black at the top of its head. The primary feathers range from dark grey to brown. The part of its face not covered by feathers has red skin.

The Szechuan White-eared Pheasant will not mate until it is two years old, then it will go into a heated breeding frenzy around the end of April. The breeding will last until June and these pheasants will produce about 4 to 7 eggs per clutch. The incubation period for their eggs is 24-25 days.

Although there is not much sexual dimorphism among the Szechuan White-eared Pheasant, the cocks are considerably larger than the hens.

Szechuan White-eared Pheasants have now become a vulnerable species. Encroaching on its habitat in agricultural China has reduced the range of the species, and hunting of these pheasants for food have threatened their numbers severely.

White-eared Pheasant

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